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Math Science Upward Bound, University of WashingtonUniversity of Washington

Classes 2017

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STEM Lectures and Study Sections

The lectures provide a series of seminars from experts in selected STEM fields. Each seminar offers an introduction to a particular STEM topic and provides a glimpse into original research in that field. Students will also have the opportunity to ask questions about research in that area and gain some insight into career pathways in the field. An emphasis is placed on cross-disciplinary topics that combine research from multiple fields.

The seminars are supported by Study Sections that help the students understand the Seminar content and learn study skills needed to succeed in lecture-type classes. In study sections, students will also have the opportunity to tour labs and facilities on campus, take part in hands-on and computer activities, and work on their group projects.

 

Computer Science

In this class, we will be introducing the basic building blocks of Computer Science. We will cover the basics of Java development, programmatic thinking and industry culture. In Java Development, we us the object oriented language Java to break down the basics of programming including: data types, control structures and objects. In Programmatic Thinking, one of the foundation skills of computer science is the act of breaking large problems down into bite sized logical blocks. We  will work on building this transferable skill as it applies to programming and general problem solving. Finally, through fun trivia, we will slowly build your understanding of the tech industry’s history, culture, and future to teach more about Industry Culture.

 

Genome Science

In Genome Sciences, the class will learn about how variations in your DNA are what make you, you! Students will learn how these variations occur and how they get passed on. We’ll also learn about how the DNA sequences of humans can affect how we develop disease and respond to external agents, like chemicals, drugs, and vaccines. Genomics is one of the hot areas of science, and we can use it to study everything from microbes to humans! We’ll talk about how scientists are able to study genomes and explore some of the computer techniques that data scientist use to analyze genomic data! No programming or previous biology experience needed.

 

Neural Engineering

Neuroscience is one of the fastest-growing areas of science today. Its growth is encouraged by new technical tools and engineering collaborations that enable us to tinker with our own nervous systems like never before. Neural engineering represents the fusion of neuroscience’s expertise on the brain with engineering approaches to treating neurological disorders, diseases, and injuries. In this interdisciplinary class, we will cover basic principles of neuroscience and bioengineering; examine applications in synthetic sensory systems, prostheses and other movement-assistive devices; and discuss of ethics of neuroscience and neural engineering. Multiple instructors with expertise in neuroscience, engineering, and philosophy will bring cutting-edge research right to you, and explore hands-on projects in their areas. This class will introduce you to the interdisciplinary world of modern research, teach you skills and knowledge on a diverse array of topics in both neuroscience and engineering, and pull back the curtain on careers in science and engineering research.

 

Latin

This course is designed to introduce students to the Latin language.  Don’t think Latin is important today?  Take a look at the first sentence again – about half of the words in it are derived from Latin!  In fact, around 60% of English words are Latinate, from the common (e.g., course, design, introduce, student, language) to the technical (e.g., inosculate, squamous, ablation, secant, ignimbrite).  By learning the fundamentals of Latin, you will expand your English vocabulary and gain the tools necessary to tackle the technical jargon of a multitude of STEM fields, from astronomy to zoology.  This course will teach you the basics of Latin grammar, but the focus will be on building your vocabulary and writing skills to help prepare you for the SAT/ACT and for your future education and career in STEM.

 

College Prep

UW MSUB College Prep is a writing intensive course designed to prepare students for competitive college admission opportunities and expectations. Students will explore careers, majors and colleges based on their interests and academic potential. Through personal assessments, self-analysis, and group problem solving, students will develop a self-directed Action Plan that will help them get from where they are to where they want to be personally, educationally and occupationally. In order to prepare students for the independent college experience, project base learning, problem solving and self-directed learning are at core of this curriculum.

This course will cover the following three topics:

College Prep: Strategies – specifically designed to enable students to take full advantage of academic resources using self-assessment tools such as LASSI and WOIS. Accessing these resources will teach students how to navigate college websites and determine potential programs and requirements that best fit their personal goals, strengths and interests. This section will also help students understand how universities look at their academic record, extracurricular activities, and standardized tests.

College Application: Strategies – specifically designed to help students explore colleges and create a list of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choice schools which best fit their needs and aspirations. In addition, students will research prerequisites for their program of choice and develop a personalized educational plan for their junior, senior and college freshman year.  This plan will include a math and science track based on their current placements.  As part of the college application process, students will learn how  access the the Common College Application  as well as develop a clear understanding of the specific components required for 4 year institutions.

College Readiness: Strategies – specifically designed to ensure students develop proactive success strategies as well as an individualized self-directed action plan. This plan will examine barriers students face and how to overcome them. Through group and individual base learning students will implement problem solving techniques to come up with creative and proactive solutions. Using Article of the Week, a strong emphasis in expository readings and writings are built into the curriculum in order to prepare students to meet college level expectations. Students are also introduced to college-level study skills, communication and presentation skills.

 

Research Writing

In this course we will work through three scaffolded assignment sequences, each of which culminates in a longer written assignment. As we will focus on writing as a process rather than a finished product, each of these major assignments represents the final step in a series of shorter writing tasks. We work in this step-by-step fashion because it’s important to recognize that effective writing does not happen overnight, as the product of intense concentration and/or inherent skill or genius. Strong writing—like the thought that goes into it—is developed slowly and carefully over time. It grows from a simple idea into more complex collection of ideas and emerges as the deliberate and organized outcome of a longer process of drafts, feedback, revision, and recreation. To further this goal, there will be many opportunities for extensive work-shopping of your writing in the course; active participation in this peer review process is essential to your success.

Together we will work to better understand how scientists pose questions, conduct research, and express their findings in writing, and moreover how we, as students in the physical sciences, can successfully do the same.

 

Math 1

This course is designed to strengthen the basic analytic skills necessary for future high school math courses and introduce students to the concepts taught in an Algebra 2 or Precalculus class. The course will examine in detail rational operations, linear operations, order of operations, and applications.

 

Math 2

This course is designed to strengthen the problem solving skills necessary for future high school math courses and introduce students to the concepts taught in Precalculus class. The course will examine methods for converting mathematical statements into common language, methods for converting common language into mathematical statements, exploration of exponential and logarithmic functions, with special attention to applications of growth and decay, and specific applications in statistics, chemistry, and physics.

 

Math 3

This course is designed to strengthen the problem solving skills necessary for future high school math courses and introduce students to the concepts taught in Precalculus class. The course will examine methods for converting mathematical statements into common language, methods for converting common language into mathematical statements, exploration of exponential and logarithmic functions, with special attention to applications of growth and decay, and specific applications in statistics, chemistry.

 

Math 4

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of differential calculus. Students will learn how their algebra knowledge and skills are utilized in this advanced mathematical subject.

The course will begin with a refresher of past topics, especially functions. It will then move on to topics of limits and then to the topic of derivatives.

 

Math 5

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts taught in an Advanced Placement Statistics class. The course will examine in detail displaying and describing data, modeling distributions of data, describing relationships in quantitative data, designing studies, and probability.